Don’t Miss Where the Whole Universe Dwells!

The Arts Council of Greater New Haven presents Where the Whole Universe Dwells at Perspectives…The Gallery at Whitney Center. Where the Whole Universe Dwells brings together five artists who balance between tangible and intangible through an innate understanding of smallness within a vast universe and the relationship between infinitesimal and cosmic.

The Arts Council will host an opening reception on Saturday, May 20 from 3 to 5 p.m. The reception will feature artists talks at 2 p.m.

The exhibition, curated by Debbie Hesse, will be on view to the public through Aug. 27, 2017, at the gallery located at 200 Leeder Hill Dr., Hamden, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 4-7 p.m., and Saturdays, 1-4 p.m. The exhibit is free and open to the public.

ABOUT THE ARTISTS

Jennifer Davies (Branford) uses papermaking to create her own intuitive forms that suggest cracked rock walls, delicate spider webs and the phases of the moon. By twisting, turning, dyeing, and stretching paper to explore its inherent properties, she creates a strong sense of physicality presence with resulting works that suggest aerial map views or the earth’s surface.

Nancy Eisenfeld (North Haven) looks at cycles of decay and resiliency using colors that correspond to the four elements of nature in her painted abstract washes.

Anne Doris-Eisner (Woodbridge) creates commanding black and white charcoal portraits of trees that juxtapose extreme attention to detail yet achieves a gestalt, creating a sense that the trees connect everything in life.

Peter Konsterlie’s (Bridgeport) paintings are both gestural and analytic, blurring boundaries between line, color and pattern to form pulsating spaces that suggest fantastical, unchartered territories that are simultaneously minute and vast.

Jen Payne (Branford) is a writer and photographer whose photographs in the show juxtapose plastic remains on the natural and human-made landscape.

For more information about Where the Whole Universe Dwells and Perspectives… The Gallery at Whitney Center email communications@newhavenarts.org or call (203) 772-2788.

IMAGE: Flosser with Paperclip at ATM, June 2016, ©Jen Payne. See also: Gallery Show and Sneak Peek

Gallery Show & Sneak Peek!

Want a preview of our upcoming book Evidence of Flossing: What We Leave Behind? Then come to the Opening Reception for Where the Whole Universe Dwells, an exhibit at Perspectives…The Gallery at Whitney Center, on Saturday, May 20 from 3-5pm.

The exhibit, presented by the Arts Council of Greater New Haven and curated by Debbie Hesse, will include photographs from Evidence of Flossing, and features work by Jennifer Davies, Nancy Eisenfeld, Anne-Doris Eisner, and Peter Konsterlie. It will be in view at the gallery from May 17 – August 27.

Perspectives…The Gallery at Whitney Center is located at 200 Leeder Hill Drive, south entrance, Hamden, Connecticut, (203) 281-6745. Hours: Tuesdays and Thursdays 4-7 p.m., and Saturdays 1-4 p.m. Click here for more information.

Like a Chapter in a Book

“Goals give us direction. They put a powerful force into play on a universal, conscious, and subconscious level. Goals give our life direction.” – Melody Beattie

I’m looking over my 2016 goals. You know, the ones that included the 50 things I would do in my 50th year? The list of resolutions long forgot? The good intentions set forth?

The success or failure of all of that reminds me of the Road Trip I took this fall. A grand plan some four years in the making that included maps, lists, and a very detailed itinerary. Did we see everything? No. Did we get to every item on the map? No. Did it matter? NO! Because in between the itemized, there were some glorious surprises, some sweet happenstances, and some uncharted moments I would never alter. Not even for a few more red checks next to my scrupulous lists.

Will I make more lists for 2017? YES!

Why? Because despite the lack of particular checkmarks, in 2016 I took a 3700-mile road trip I’ve dreamed about all my life! I also visited the Guggenheim Museum and saw a Red Sox game in Boston. I bought a new camera, wrote a poem a day for National Poetry Month, and got my writing published. I cooked Ina Garten’s 4-hour lamb, recited Jabberwocky from memory to a live audience, and baked a chocolate cake from scratch. I read 39 books, found a pearl in an oyster, and made time for love and friendship, writing and reading every week from the start.

“The new year stands before us, like a chapter in a book, waiting to be written,” writes Melody Beattie in The Language of Letting Go. “We can help write that story by setting goals.”

So, what is your story for 2017?

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©2016, Jen Payne. Photo at Inspiration Point, Yellowstone National Park.

This book is an oasis…and a great gift idea!


“This book is an oasis, a place to visit to reconnect with beauty and nature. I like to randomly open to any page and read where I land, poetry or prose, interwoven with gorgeous photographs. Invariably, what I find is calming and centering, like a little vacation from the swirling world. An inspiring collection!” (Amazon Review by Kat Lehmann, July 2016)


book

LOOK UP! Musings on the Nature of Mindfulness
288 pages, 5×7, 100 Color Photos
Index, Bibliography
$29.53, includes tax + shipping

Written by Jen Payne, this full-color journal includes essays and poetry about nature, stunning photography, and a collection of quotations by philosophers, poets, naturalists, and famous writers.

Click here for more information about the book.
Click here to order your copy today!

Direct-order books are signed by the author and include a free bookmark. Final price includes shipping & handling, plus CT sales tax. If you are ordering from the Connecticut shoreline area, or would like to order more than 2 or 3 books, please email me. I’d be happy to deliver and save the shipping costs.

RoadTrip 16: Speaking of Stories

The first book I read upon my return home from the epic RoadTrip 16 was Jenny of the Tetons by Kristiana Gregory. It’s a sweet piece of historical fiction written for young adults based on the life of English trapper Beaver Dick Leigh, his Shoshoni wife Jenny, and their children. Using excerpts from Leigh’s own journal, the book tells a story of this pioneer family living in the Grand Tetons of the 1870s.

Wonderfully, Gregory was able to obtain a photo of the Leighs from the American Heritage Center at the University of Wyoming, which makes the story all the more poignant.

The photo, the maps, and her descriptions of the Tetons and Wyoming offered a chance to see the place I had just visited in more vivid and layered detail. Perhaps that is why I arrived home with a small collection of books, and an even larger Reading List—both related and completely otherwise—dotting the map from Wisconsin all the way to Jenny’s Grand Tetons!

Maybe you’ll find something that whets your curiosity, too!

Spring Green, Wisconsin
The Women, T. C. Boyle
Loving Frank, Nancy Horan
Frank Lloyd Wright & His Manner of Thought, Jerome Klinkowitz
Never Enough: The Creative Life of Alex Jordan, Tom Kupsh
The Bird Sisters, Rebecca Rasmussen
A Basket of Sculptured Thoughts, Gladys Walsh
The Fellowship, Harold Zellman and Roger Friedland

McGregor, Iowa
Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, Ransom Riggs

Walnut Grove, Minnesota
Little House on the Prarie, Laura Ingalls Wilder

Pipestone, Minnesota
Sister to the Sioux, Elaine Goodale Eastman
Old Indian Legends, Zitkala-Sa

Rapid City, South Dakota
The Thin Place, Kathryn Davis
Independence Day, Richard Ford
Stones from the River, Ursula Hegi
The Guest Cat, Takashi Hiraide
Waiting, Ha Jin
My Seven Lives, Solveig Sedlet
The Map of Love, Ahdaf Soueif
The Glass Castle, Jeannette Walls

Crazy Horse, South Dakota
Flight, Sherman Alexie
Reservation Blues, Sherman Alexie
The Spirit of Indian Women, Judith Fitzgerald and Michael Oren Fitzgerald

Yellowstone, Wyoming
Death in Yellowstone, Lee H Whittlesey

Jackson, Wyoming
La Rose, Louise Erdrich
The Hour of Land, Terry Tempest Williams
The Earth Shall Weep, James Wilson

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©2016 Jen Payne. Photos: reading in the library room at Hisega Lodge; message at Art Alley, Rapid City, SD

in the wake of fantasía

his lips would taste of lime
and crushed mint……warm like añejo rum

his kisses, poetry
Neruda nuzzled between breasts
Cortázar caressing pale thighs

afternoons in the shade of
palm trees, shutters barely
masking heat and storm

full to the margin,
neverending like Márquez
words spilled on silk

the air sweet and
heavy like tobacco
in the aftermath……red wine

Hemingway read out loud
ripe fruits on a platter, dripping

Poem ©2016, Jen Payne. Image: Woman with Fruit, Walasse Ting.

idle pleasures: a found poem

READING THE BOOK OF IDLE PLEASURES
BY DAN KIERAN AND TOM HODGKINSON

taking a bath, poking the fire, slouching, leaf catching, the balcony, waiting for the tea to brew, messing about in boats, tree houses, strolling through the city, procrastinating, letting the weeds grow, the deck chair, taking a nap, déjà vu, the public bench

dog walking, the beach, just looking, melancholy, walking with toddlers, singing, sunbeams, sticking matchsticks into vegetables to make vegetable aliens, looking at maps, sowing seeds, hanging out in the library, being ill, sleeping in your clothes, arranging records, caves, face pulling competitions, not opening letters, tree climbing

sneering, reading poetry, squishing bread, perusing the sky mall catalog, sleeping outside, dreaming, telling stories, feeling the wind in your hair, staring, the bathrobe, a pack of cards, chatting with the mail carrier, learning the names of trees, writing a letter, jumping for joy, hugs, wandering around old churches, shadow watching

the garden shed, sit-ins, the contemplation of things that fly, squeezing bubblewrap, whistling, morning sex, getting dressed, smiling, breast-feeding, libraries, forgetting, doodling, slippers, yawning, fishing, pacing, skipping stones, merrymaking, lying around in fields, watching the river flow, butterfly hunting, hiding, cloud watching

snow, arranging flowers, thrift shop ESP, leaning on gates, overnight trains, whittling, watching hail bounce off the pavement, stargazing, watching the birds, gossip, leaning on walls, grooming, philosophizing, straw chewing

good company, building houses of cards, cycling, dancing, reading edward lear poems out loud to children, laundromats, choosing to get wet in the rain, reading gravestones, folding paper, feeding the birds, bell ringing, lying in a hammocks

Found poem, ©2016, Jen Payne, courtesy of The Book of Idle Pleasure by Dan Kieran and Tom Hodgkinson, National Poetry Month, 9. Reading Poetry illustration by Ged Wells.